Archive for the health care Tag

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High Tech & High Touch – New Trends in Health Care

Last Friday, Mark Bertolini, the Chairman, President and CEO of Aetna Inc., was on CNBC Squawk Box explaining Aetna’s  innovative approach to dealing with health plan members  who have chronic diseases.   Bertolini said: for those with chronic disease we use “ high tech / high touch”. An example of high tech is blue tooth technology built into a bathroom scale,
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Alternatives to traditional health insurance – Two Stories

Can’t afford or choose not to pay the high monthly fees for traditional individual health insurance?    Amy Jeter, the health business reporter for the Virginian Pilot has an article in Saturday’s edition that highlights a small but growing trend to dealing with the high cost of private health insurance policies. According to the article: “In the past few years, the
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Employers Take Hard Look at Health Care Value Proposition

“Virginia businesses need to demand more for the money they are spending on health care by shifting the focus from cost to quality.”    This was from an article last week in the Richmond Times Dispatch by Michael Martz, about a meeting of a new Chamber of Commerce Health committee. Bob Cramer, manager of human resources at Norfolk Southern Corporation is
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Medical Tests for the Elderly – Beneficial or Not?

Thanks to Gary Schwitzer’s tweet today @garyschwitzer and his blog site HealthNewsReview,  for directing our attention to a Kaiser Health News piece, yesterday, by Sandra G. Boodman titled: “Concern is Growing That the Elderly Get Too Many Medical Tests”. Taking care of those who have loved, provided and supported us is only right, but more and more “taking care” is
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Missing Subject at Health Care Town Hall Meeting

Last evening I attended a Town Hall meeting in Virginia Beach, VA hosted by our Congressman, Rep. Scott Rigell.  The topic was health care and Rep Rigell, a freshman congressman and former Ford Dealer, invited Reps. Roe (TN), Gingrey (GA), Buashon (IN) – all three of whom were practicing M.D.s before entering congress. About 250 (my estimate) people showed up
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Reading Medicine’s Side-Effects can be Unhealthy

My thanks to Keith Wommack, the media and legislative spokesperson for Christian Science in Texas, for this guest post today.   Have you ever listened to the possible side-effects of a drug as advertised on TV and then felt queasy? Reading about those effects can make you feel bad as well, it turns out. Fiona Macrae’s recent Health post, The health
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Assurance for the Uninsured

This past Friday I attended the second in a series of meetings of the Virginia Health Reform Initiative Advisory Committee.  This group is appointed by the Governor and its current task is to report to the state legislature by October 1st 2011 on whether Virginia should create a Health Benefit Exchange and if so how it would operate. At Friday’s
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“Where Your Treasure Is…”

  The lead sentence of a recent L.A. Times “Booster Shot” health blog, got my attention. It read: “Spending on healthcare in the United States continued to far outpace other industrialized countries in 2009, according to a new tally by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development “ (OECD). Having read T.R. Reid’s New York Times Bestseller “The Healing of
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Health Care: Good News About Questionable Practices

  Saturday’s New York Times lead article titled “Medical Claims Show Overuse of CT Scans” reported on data soon to be released by Center for Medicaid and Medicare about hospitals who have a high percentage of having patients undergo two CT scans, when many feel that one is sufficient and two may be harmful. Why is this good news? It’s
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Challenging the “if” / “then” predictions of prescription drugs

If, then.   How often during the day do we hear this? If you don’t do ______, then this (some kind of bad event) will happen to you. The Robert Woods Johnson Foundation wondered what would happen to those who take prescription drugs for a chronic condition if their prescription duration dropped from 100 to 34 days.   They used actual data
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